Story of Penicillin

This is one of my favourite stories; I have included it because it is a great example of the principle that;

” a small result is better than no result at all.”

When a team of scientists in London first used penicillin they failed, but in their failure they succeeded.

The patient died but that did not mean the drug did not work, it just did not work enough to save his life.

He did initially start to recover.

Our faith works the same way, we pray for someone and they improve, then they relapse.
This means that our faith worked, we had faith for recovery instead of faith for completion.

We have to be like these scientists and realise that we are on the right track even though we are not yet winning.

We know that our faith works; all we have to do is learn how to make it work on a higher level.

The story of penicillin – the first antibiotic to successfully treat people with serious infectious diseases – begins with a bit of luck.

Alexander Fleming, a British scientist, noticed in 1928 that mould had prevented the growth of bacteria in his lab.

But the main plot of the story involves the rediscovery of penicillin 10 years later by an Australian scientist:

Howard Florey and his team transformed penicillin from an interesting observation into a life saver.

Penicillin kills bacteria by blocking cell wall growth.

In May, 1940 they performed one of the most important medical experiments in history on mice in the laboratory.

The results were so exciting: Florey knew that it was time to test the drug on humans. But Florey’s team didn’t have enough of the drug to see the patient through to a full recovery and he unfortunately had a re-lapse and died.

Because of this experience, the team then concentrated their efforts on sick children, who did not require such large quantities.

I would like to quote part of the story…where they realise, they did not have enough of the substance.

“But Florey’s team didn’t have enough of the drug to see the patient through to a full recovery and he unfortunately had a re-lapse and died.”

They knew how to make the drug, but they did not have the ability to make it in large quantities.

So they needed help.

And that is how sharing your vision with other like-minded people helps to grow your faith.

Here is what they did:

“But the team needed large drug companies to help produce the large amounts required.”

It can be dangerous to share your vision with other people because there is a war going on between belief and un-belief.

We have to surround ourselves with believing believers.

Sometimes we need other people’s help to produce more faith.

Tony Egar

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